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Short Videos are Tools for Learning

Posted by Cynthia Berger on Friday, January 30, 2015

How do you learn to teach something new? They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Videos will never replace the first-hand experience you get in a professional development workshop, where you interact with a facilitator, share ideas with other teachers, and try out classroom activities. Still, videos are increasingly popular as a way to demonstrate teaching practices because they can capture the complexity of a bustling classroom.

Not to mention that if you don’t "get it at a glance," you can pause and rewind to your heart’s content.How do you learn to teach something new? They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Videos will never replace the first-hand experience you get in a professional development workshop, where you interact with a facilitator, share ideas with other teachers, and try out classroom activities. Still, videos are increasingly popular as a way to demonstrate teaching practices because they can capture the complexity of a bustling classroom. Not to mention that if you don’t "get it at a glance," you can pause and rewind to your heart’s content.

That’s why EiE offers both learner-driven professional development workshops AND an extensive library of online short videos for teachers. Our video library got even bigger and better recently with the addition of “Spotlight Videos”— documentary-style videos that demonstrate and explain effective classroom practices.

“Many elementary teachers feel uncomfortable teaching engineering,” says Martha Davis, EiE’s videography project manager. “We designed Spotlight videos to showcase best-practice teaching strategies and give teachers tools to address some common classroom challenges.”

Take a look at the Spotlight video “Dealing with Data,” which integrates candid scenes from several elementary classrooms. “The students in these classrooms get results that are completely different from what the teachers expect,” says Kristin Sargianis, EiE’s director of professional development. “But it’s not a disaster, it’s a teachable moment. You can see the teachers model strategies that help children do their own troubleshooting.”

I appreciated the example of the educator discussing, not dismissing, the data inconsistencies,” says RaeAnn Fox, a teacher from Phoenix, AZ who helped evaluate the Spotlight videos before they were released. “The section where you showed the students coming up with explanations was perfect—it was great to hear the kids' discussion.”

The new “Spotlights” join our “How-To Videos,” which offer tips for lesson prep (like how to mix play dough or turn shoeboxes into solar ovens), and our “Classroom Videos,” which show real teachers, in real classrooms, doing EiE activities.  

A total of six Spotlight videos have been released and are available for streaming on the EiE website. Over the next year, Davis and her team plan to produce several more.

EiE SPOTLIGHT VIDEOS  

The Engineering Design Process in Action”: Learn strategies for guiding your students through the EiE engineering design process

What the Research Says”: How engineering supports learning for elementary students

The Difference Between Science and Engineering”: How these fields differ—and connect.

Dealing with Data”: When student experiences yield unexpected results, it’s a teachable moment.

Asking Good Questions”: Help students troubleshoot their design solutions

Materials Preparation”: Time-saving tips for organizing your EiE materials.

- See more at: http://eie.org/blog/eie-blog-short-videos-are-tools-learning#sthash.GrT9Uygv.dpuf

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That’s why EiE offers both learner-driven professional development workshops AND an extensive library of online short videos for teachers. Our video library got even bigger and better recently with the addition of “Spotlight Videos”— documentary-style videos that demonstrate and explain effective classroom practices.

“Many elementary teachers feel uncomfortable teaching engineering,” says Martha Davis, EiE’s videography project manager. “We designed Spotlight videos to showcase best-practice teaching strategies and give teachers tools to address some common classroom challenges.”

Take a look at the Spotlight video “Dealing with Data,” which integrates candid scenes from several elementary classrooms. “The students in these classrooms get results that are completely different from what the teachers expect,” says Kristin Sargianis, EiE’s director of professional development. “But it’s not a disaster, it’s a teachable moment. You can see the teachers model strategies that help children do their own troubleshooting.”

“I appreciated the example of the educator discussing, not dismissing, the data inconsistencies,” says RaeAnn Fox, a teacher from Phoenix, AZ who helped evaluate the Spotlight videos before they were released. “The section where you showed the students coming up with explanations was perfect—it was great to hear the kids' discussion.”

The new “Spotlights” join our “How-To Videos,” which offer tips for lesson prep (like how to mix play dough or turn shoeboxes into solar ovens), and our “Classroom Videos,” which show real teachers, in real classrooms, doing EiE activities.  

A total of six Spotlight videos have been released and are available for streaming on the EiE website. Over the next year, Davis and her team plan to produce several more.

EiE SPOTLIGHT VIDEOS  

The Engineering Design Process in Action”: Learn strategies for guiding your students through the EiE engineering design process

What the Research Says”: How engineering supports learning for elementary students

The Difference Between Science and Engineering”: How these fields differ—and connect.

Dealing with Data”: When student experiences yield unexpected results, it’s a teachable moment.

Asking Good Questions”: Help students troubleshoot their design solutions

Materials Preparation”: Time-saving tips for organizing your EiE materials.
- See more at: http://eie.org/blog/eie-blog-short-videos-are-tools-learning#sthash.GrT9Uygv.dpuf

 

Written by Cynthia Berger

Cynthia Berger is manager for communications at Engineering is Elementary, a project of the Museum of Science, Boston

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