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Kate Sokol

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Tuesday, August 1

Behind the Scenes at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab

Today’s guest blogger is Kate Sokol, a curriculum designer for EiE.

This past March, a small EiE crew—a film producer, a sound engineer, and a handful of EiE curriculum developers—traveled across the country to explore NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), interview NASA engineers, and create a video introducing middle-school-aged youth to the field of remote sensing for our upcoming Engineering Everywhere unit Worlds Apart: Engineering Remote Sensing Devices.

Engineering Habits of Mind | Thursday, May 11

Teaching Ethics: It's More Important Than Ever

Today’s guest blogger is Kate Sokol, a curriculum designer for EiE.

As a curriculum writer for Engineering is Elementary, I’m always thinking about developing activities that promote engineering habits of mind. Many habits of mind; like “collaboration,” “communication,” and “creativity”; naturally integrate with the type of hands-on engineering activities that we develop, and are often used to describe the work of engineers. Other habits, like the call for “ethical considerations,” require deliberate reflection to fully integrate into the K-8 classroom. The idea of ethics in engineering may seem like a daunting topic to navigate with students, but the power of critical thinking and the opportunity for students to consider the impact of their decisions has never been more important.

Engineering Habits of Mind | Monday, January 23

Assessing the Implications of Solutions is an Engineering Habit of Mind

Today’s guest blogger is Kate Sokol, a curriculum designer for EiE.

As a curriculum writer for Engineering is Elementary, I’m always thinking about developing activities that promote engineering habits of mind. Many habits of mind; like “collaboration,” “communication,” and “creativity”; naturally integrate with the type of hands-on engineering activities that we develop, and are often used to describe the work of engineers. Other habits, like the call for “ethical considerations,” require deliberate reflection to fully integrate into the K-8 classroom. The idea of ethics in engineering may seem like a daunting topic to navigate with students, but the power of critical thinking and the opportunity for students to consider the impact of their decisions has never been more important.

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